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2018: Year in Review

By on Dec 31, 2018 in Photography | 0 comments

I had this great idea for an amazing “year in review” post. Sadly, it sort of fell apart as I got lost in re-editing all my images from the past year. Hours flew by as I reminisced and combed through all the images of all the places that I went. I forgot what I was going to write about. However, I realized that my purpose here or better yet, the reason that you are here is because of my photos. I just want to take you through a year of my photography (explaining as I go) with more photos than words. This was the first series that I shot in 2018 and strangely one that will have a big impact in 2019 Pyeongchang 2018 Winter Olympics were a high point of the year for me. Not only did I get a chance to work for Visa and Flixel but I also got to work with some of the best photographers in country! I also got to enjoy the games as well. This was a great time out as I had been...

The Bucket Shot: You Can Do It Too

By on Dec 28, 2018 in Getting the Shot, Photography, Theory Thursday | 0 comments

I don’t want to make this another DIY Photography-style, post where I pop a youtube video in a post and then add a couple of sentences about what I think. Instead, I am going to use the video as a point of reference for a larger topic. Peter McKinnon dropped his latest video yesterday and it is everything you’d expect from the guy who forever changed photography-youtube videos. To be honest, I feel that the man deserves his own show on Netflix. However, the point I want to explore is something that he talks about in the video. I would say that every photographer has that one shot that they are dreaming about getting. That one shot that pushes them to get up so early. That drives them to invest time and money into a craft that in some cases rarely pays off. With 2019 only days away, I want everyone to sit back, watch the video, and think about what your bucket shot is....

Using One Location

By on Nov 28, 2018 in Getting the Shot, Photography, Technique Tuesday, Tutorials | 0 comments

This past fall, I found myself in this beautiful river valley just North of Ulsan, South Korea. This was probably the most beautiful spot for fall leaves in the area. I wanted to make the most of the location as I felt that it was perfect. As I looked around, I saw so many possibilities with just one small area. Wide Angle I first went for the obvious “safe shots” which are the ones that people expect from a location like this. The wide shots showing the morning light and the falling leaves. Shots like these really are best to start off with as they get your head in the game. They get you into the “photography mode” and not thinking about anything else. These shots give a while perspective on the area and what I am looking at. I am not doing anything too creative here, just making sure that I have the area covered. Think of these shots are your “first...

The Yashica DigiFilm Saga

By on Oct 12, 2018 in Photography, Reviews | 2 comments

On October 10th, 2017 a daring project was launched on Kickstarter. The project was to revive the legendary camera brand Yashica and create a hybrid camera that combined the limitations and character of film  with the ease of use that comes with shooting digital. All of this was going to be wrapped up in a retro-styled rangefinder camera that reminded us of the legendary Electro 35 GSN. It struck a nerve with many people and according to their kickstarter update on October 11th, the project was fully funded in only 4 hours. Shortly after, the first impressions started popping up. Reviews like this one from DP Review, labelled it as “everything wrong with retro design” and noted that 5,100 “fools” back the initial campaign. By the time that both the Kickstarter and the Indiegogo campaigns finished there were a total of 7,967 “fools” eagerly...

10 Photographers You Should Follow

By on Oct 8, 2018 in Photography | 2 comments

I am sure that you have all  seen that meme about how people will buy shoes from Michael Jordan but not support their friends or family in their new business or side gig. I feel in many ways this is the same for photography. In many ways, we have been programmed to admire celebrities over our friends or family. We trust their “brand” more than our “buddy”  who goes out every weekend to get the most beautiful shots you can imagine.   View this post on Instagram   A post shared by Neonnoir / Cyberpunk / Street (@noealzii) on Oct 8, 2018 at 2:37am PDT Recently, fellow photographer Noe Alonzo, had been putting in a lot of time creating jaw dropping images of Seoul and just becoming a force in the photography world here in South Korea. His images went viral and his profiles got hammered with new subscribers. I was shocked to see that he shared the wealth...

Arsenal Review

By on Sep 29, 2018 in Photography, Reviews | 0 comments

Recently, I have been exploring a lot of new ways to take and edit photos using AI or artificial intelligence. The first piece of gear that I bought was Arsenal: The Intelligent Camera Assistant. I bought this off of Kickstarter and was eager to test it out. I wanted to see if the images it produced with its “smart capture” feature could really lived up to what the campaign said that it could do. So far, I have been impressed, but I think a few more updates would make Arsenal a lot better. What Is It? Essentially, Arsenal is a trigger that connects your camera to your phone or other device. It allows you to see what your camera sees and adjust the settings. Arsenal can set up and create timelapse video and at some point, actually record video. So far, the app has not let me record video using my Canon 5D MKiii. The main feature is that Arsenal AI in the smart capture...

Canada: Wonders of Whistler

By on Sep 20, 2018 in Getting the Shot, Photography, Theory Thursday, Where to Shoot | 0 comments

  Our time in the prairies was filled with lots of great memories and the realization that we have been gone too long. Being home has this funny way of lulling you into such a state of comfortableness that you could easily be home for a month and not even realize it. Sadly, we only had a week this time and we had to get moving. The next stop was Whistler, BC. This place has a lot of history for me. It was a place where I had lived while I was a broke student and where I first explored photography with my Father’s Pentax Spotmatic F. The last time I was there was with my late friend Dave Harvey. So it it has a special place in my heart for many reasons. I could easily retire there… if I had a few million dollars to throw around. Heading up to Whistler, I had a lot of expectations for what I wanted to shoot. I had done my research and made a shot list of what I wanted. I...

Canada: Exploring the Prairies

By on Sep 14, 2018 in Photography, Theory Thursday | 0 comments

I don’t get to travel home very often. For me it is always a bittersweet moment, as you realize just how far and how long you’ve been away. You see your parents getting older and your friends moving on. It can be tough at times. However, it also gives you a different lens to shoot with, in some regards. This trip home came after a few family struggles and my Grandmother passing away on my birthday last year. Suffice to say that I really wasn’t in the right mindset to go out and get some good shots. However, I did bring my camera with most places. It was when I stopped at seemingly “normal” places and really focussed on what those places were saying to me, that I started to rediscover my hometown. What is the Scene Saying? By this, I mean, “why did you stop and look there?” or “What is jumping out and capturing your attention?” when...

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