Google PlusFacebookTwitter

Flying a Drone in South Korea

By on Mar 19, 2019 in Photography | 0 comments

If you are living or traveling to South Korea, here are some rules and advice that you should know before launching your drone. This advice not only comes from the actual websites but from my own personal experience as well. Often you are going to find sites that have just copied and pasted the general drone rules for Korea and only reflect on part of the experience. Korea has accepted drone use and actually many people quite enjoy using drones as a hobby. However, this is still a country with many military sites, competitive companies, and high-level government facilities scattered across the country. It is best to understand not only the rules, regulations, and laws, but the acceptable practices as well. Licences and Permission At the time of this writing, you do not need a license to fly a drone in Korea. However, if you are flying a larger commercial drone, you will need to to...

Text and Cinemagraphs: 2 Options to Make More Creative Content

By on Mar 12, 2019 in Photography, Technique Tuesday, Tutorials | 0 comments

Cinemagraphs are great for ads and promotions, but it is always a challenge blending in your text or logo into a cinemagraph. Dues to the way that we currently create cinemagraphs, having test that may bleed over onto the masked out move areas, just didn’t look that good as you would still have to cut away parts. It just doesn’t look good. For an idea of the old way, check the video below and excuse the lame joke at the beginning. At any rate, you had really only one option and that was to export the top image and add text away from the moving parts of the cinemagraph and then import into cinemagraph pro. Fortunately, Flixel and Over have found a solution to this import/export/can’t have graphis over the moving parts issue. I will be taking you through both apps today to show you their new functionality and how it can make your cinemagraphs event better! Cinemagraph...

How a New Personal Project Keeps Me Inspired

By on Jan 16, 2019 in Photography | 0 comments

A few months ago I got a call from Dylan Goldby, who is a legendary photographer and writer for F-stoppers. He was coming down to my neck-of-the-woods and wanted to meet up for some sunrise shots and some coffee. Checking the map, I had to laugh as he told me to meet him at the baby bottle lighthouse, which is in front of the Mazinger Z Lighthouse which next to the Taekwon V Lighthouse. I got a good little chuckle out of this. Chatting over coffee, Dylan and I discussed some of the many unique lighthouses that there are around the area. This got me thinking about a new personal project. Why not shoot all the unique lighthouses that I can find in Korea? Fishing for more information, I posted to several photography groups in the area. My friend Leigh MacArthur suggested starting a new instagram account for this project as he did. Leigh started a new account some time ago for...

Flickr’s ReBirth

By on Jan 11, 2019 in Photography | 6 comments

Flickr for me was my starting point as a photographer. It was way way back in 2006 when I first started uploading my photos and I really haven’t stopped. Flickr has served me as a backup and as a portfolio for many years. Flickr was always a place for photography and photos… good or bad. I watched flickr go through some low times and slowly slide into obscurity. Sites like 500px and instagram came in and pushed Flickr further away to the point were few were using it and the groups were dead. Yet, flickr somehow stuck around. It got handed off to different people who promised to make it better or at least “what it was” and then nothing happened. Now, we see that Smugmug has picked up the torch and is planning to do something with Flickr. What that is, I am not sure at this stage in the game. However, those with a free account are seeing the first of many changes....

Gampo Sunrise: How I Got the Shot

By on Jan 4, 2019 in Photography | 0 comments

ISO 50 105mm f/7.1 184.0 sec canon 5D MKiii 24-105mm lens with 10 stop ND filter Recently, I posted this online to one of my favourite photo groups on Facebook and was asked about posting the settings in order to help people better understand how to I achieved this shot. It is a common question but I feel that it only shows part of the puzzle. It’s a bit like asking a cook how much spice did they put in their sufflet. Only knowing the amount, you still won’t be able to make the same dish. Photography is much the same. With this in mind, I thought that I would breakdown the whole image. Giving you a better understanding of the process rather than hoping if you copy the settings in the image caption that you will achieve a similar result. Location I scouted this location a couple of days prior and saw that the rocks in the water are a very interesting. This is a popular area...

2018: Year in Review

By on Dec 31, 2018 in Photography | 0 comments

I had this great idea for an amazing “year in review” post. Sadly, it sort of fell apart as I got lost in re-editing all my images from the past year. Hours flew by as I reminisced and combed through all the images of all the places that I went. I forgot what I was going to write about. However, I realized that my purpose here or better yet, the reason that you are here is because of my photos. I just want to take you through a year of my photography (explaining as I go) with more photos than words. This was the first series that I shot in 2018 and strangely one that will have a big impact in 2019 Pyeongchang 2018 Winter Olympics were a high point of the year for me. Not only did I get a chance to work for Visa and Flixel but I also got to work with some of the best photographers in country! I also got to enjoy the games as well. This was a great time out as I had been...

The Bucket Shot: You Can Do It Too

By on Dec 28, 2018 in Getting the Shot, Photography, Theory Thursday | 0 comments

I don’t want to make this another DIY Photography-style, post where I pop a youtube video in a post and then add a couple of sentences about what I think. Instead, I am going to use the video as a point of reference for a larger topic. Peter McKinnon dropped his latest video yesterday and it is everything you’d expect from the guy who forever changed photography-youtube videos. To be honest, I feel that the man deserves his own show on Netflix. However, the point I want to explore is something that he talks about in the video. I would say that every photographer has that one shot that they are dreaming about getting. That one shot that pushes them to get up so early. That drives them to invest time and money into a craft that in some cases rarely pays off. With 2019 only days away, I want everyone to sit back, watch the video, and think about what your bucket shot is....

Using One Location

By on Nov 28, 2018 in Getting the Shot, Photography, Technique Tuesday, Tutorials | 0 comments

This past fall, I found myself in this beautiful river valley just North of Ulsan, South Korea. This was probably the most beautiful spot for fall leaves in the area. I wanted to make the most of the location as I felt that it was perfect. As I looked around, I saw so many possibilities with just one small area. Wide Angle I first went for the obvious “safe shots” which are the ones that people expect from a location like this. The wide shots showing the morning light and the falling leaves. Shots like these really are best to start off with as they get your head in the game. They get you into the “photography mode” and not thinking about anything else. These shots give a while perspective on the area and what I am looking at. I am not doing anything too creative here, just making sure that I have the area covered. Think of these shots are your “first...

Subscribe To The Sajin Newsletter

Join our mailing list to receive the latest posts and photos from Jason Teale Photography.

You have Successfully Subscribed!

Pin It on Pinterest